Skip to content

Improving coverage measurement

Because of challenges in measurement, progress can often only be tracked through the use of proxy measures, which increase the risk of inappropriate decisions being made in maternal and newborn health. This issue affects stakeholders around the world, particularly women and children who might benefit from life-saving interventions.

Working with global and national partners, IDEAS aims to improve the measurement of priority indicators for maternal and newborn health by testing the coverage estimates derived from multiple sources – including household interviews, service user exit interviews, last event interviews with health facility staff and review of facility records – against gold standard coverage estimates obtained by the observation of births. Further, our research involves developing and testing methods for linking data sources so actionable effective coverage measures are generated.

Published content

Journal article
Maternal, newborn, and child health and the Sustainable Development Goals-a call for sustained and improved measurement [Comment]

This paper was written by measurement experts, and discusses how to improve meausrement for women, adolescents, children and newborns in the face of the new Sustainable Development Goals.

Blog Post
Measuring content of contacts reveals missed opportunities to deliver quality maternal and newborn health care

Findings have been published in Plos One and the data supporting this analysis are now freely available online. Quality of health care is a big...

Journal article
Adding Content to Contacts: Measurement of High Quality Contacts for Maternal and Newborn Health in Ethiopia, North East Nigeria, and Uttar Pradesh, India

Families in high mortality settings need regular contact with high quality health services. This paper presents a method for estimating the population level coverage of high quality contacts.

Journal article
Measurement of delayed bathing and early initiation of breastfeeding: a cross-sectional survey exploring experiences of data collectors in Ethiopia

This paper recommends that the inclusion of standard probes or follow-on questions to the existing survey tools assessing delayed bathing and early initiation of breastfeeding. Data collectors also require further guidance in using appropriate probes to gather accurate maternal responses.